What are the Kentucky FHA Credit Score Requirements for 2020 Mortgage Loan Approvals?


If you are looking to refinance your mortgage loan, you’ll want to be prepared to meet your lender’s criteria and educate yourself about your FICO® Scores as they are the credit scores most commonly used in the mortgage refinancing process.

As there are different versions of the FICO Score, it’s important that you focus on the FICO Score versions used in mortgage lending. It’s highly likely that the following FICO Score versions will be pulled on all mortgage loan applicants and from all three credit bureaus:

FICO Score 5 based on Equifax data
FICO Score 2 based on Experian data
FICO Score 4 based on TransUnion data
You can access the scores along with the top reasons why the scores are not higher at myFICO. Focusing your credit actions on these top reasons could help you to understand your scores and gain access to more attractive rates.

You can now focus on those mortgage-related versions in your FICO Score explanation report with confidence knowing they are the same versions your mortgage lender will likely access in the refinance loan review process.

1. Based on $300,000 mortgage loan with fixed interest rate of 4.5% and 30-yr term

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Louisville Kentucky Mortgage Loans

via What are the Kentucky FHA Credit Score Requirements for 2020 Mortgage Loan Approvals?

If you are looking to refinance your mortgage loan, you’ll want to be prepared to meet your lender’s criteria and educate yourself about your FICO® Scores as they are the credit scores most commonly used in the mortgage refinancing process.

As there are different versions of the FICO Score, it’s important that you focus on the FICO Score versions used in mortgage lending. It’s highly likely that the following FICO Score versions will be pulled on all mortgage loan applicants and from all three credit bureaus:

FICO Score 5 based on Equifax data
FICO Score 2 based on Experian data
FICO Score 4 based on TransUnion data
You can access the scores along with the top reasons why the scores are not higher at myFICO. Focusing your credit actions on these top reasons could help you…

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Kentucky Mortgage Loan Info in regards to Credit Score, Down payments and debt to income ratios.


Loan Info in regards to Credit Score, Down payments and debt to income ratios.

 

Here are a few Kentucky mortgage misconceptions in regards to qualifying for a Mortgage loan in 2020

Credit Score Myth For Kentucky Mortgage Loans

53% of people surveyed believe they need a minimum credit score of 650 to qualify for a mortgage.

 

Credit Score Facts For Kentucky Mortgage Loans

There are many loan programs available for credit scores as low as 580 for government backed loans like FHA, VA, and USDA.

Down Payment Myths for Kentucky Mortgage Loans

The minimum down payment required is 3% (or even 20%).

 

Down Payment Fact

Many loan programs, including conventional loans, are available with down payments as low as 3%. USDA, VA, and Kentucky Housing Corp with their down payment assistance offer zero down payment options. 

Debt-to-Income Myths for Kentucky Mortgage Loans

Most people think 40 to 45%% (percent of your monthly income that goes to debt payments) is the max.

 

Debt-to-Income Fact

Lenders may accept higher ratios depending on things like credit score and down payment amount. FHA and VA will allow over 50% debt to income ratios on the back-end, but Conventional and USDA restrict their back-end debt to income ratios to 45% or less.

 

Think back to the last time you financed a purchase — be it a home, automobile, or what have you… You may remember having heard the term “debt-to-income ratio.” Today I want to spend some time going over exactly what this ratio is, and to also touch on how it can effect your personal finances.

What is your debt-to-income ratio?

Commonly referred to as your “DTI,” your debt-to-income ratio is a personal finance benchmark that relates your monthly debt payments to your monthly gross income.
As an example… Let’s say that your gross monthly salary is $5,000 and you are spending $2,800 of it toward monthly debt payments. In that case, your DTI would be an unhealthy 56%.
This version of your DTI is sometimes referred to as your “back-end” DTI. This is often broken down further to give a front-end debt-to-income ratio, which is a component of your back-end DTI.

How to calculate your front-end DTI for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

Your front-end DTI is calculated by dividing your monthly housing costs by your monthly gross income. Front-end DTI for renters is simply the amount paid in rent, whereas for homeowners it is the sum of mortgage principal, interest, property taxes, and home insurance (i.e., your PITI) divided by gross monthly income.
From above, if that $2,800 in debt payments is attributable to $1,500 in housing costs and $1,300 in non-housing costs, then your front-end DTI is $1,500/$5,000 = 30% (and your back-end ratio is still 56%, as calculated above).

How lenders use your DTI for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval

Kentucky Mortgage lenders typically use DTI (along with other variables) to determine whether or not you qualify for a loan, and to help determine your Kentucky mortgage rate. A high front-end DTI raises red flags with lenders because it is commonly associated with borrower default. In fact, reducing front-end DTI to reduce the risk of homeowner default was one of the main objectives of the loan modification programs introduced by the government in 2009.
There are specific limits for DTI that are used as cut-off points when evaluating borrowers. Current DTI limits for conventional conforming mortgage loans are typically 28% on the front end and 36% on the back end, though these limits are slightly higher for government subsidized Kentucky FHA loans.
While there are certainly other factors to consider
Acceptable Ratios
Housing Debt to Income
Conventional 28% 41-50%
FHA 29% 41-56.5%
VA
USDA/RHS
KHC 
29%
29%
40%
41-65%
41-45%
50%
Higher ratios may be accepted with compensating factors: low loan value, large cash reserves after closing, high credit scores, etc,

 

The bottom line: When it comes to home loans, one size definitely does not fit all, and it can be hard to determine what’s best for your situation on your own. Speaking to a mortgage professional about your unique circumstances is usually your best bet.

Ready to get started? Contact us at 502-905-3708.

 

 

 

Credit Score Information For Kentucky Home buyers

Credit Scores are important for getting approved for a Mortgage in Kentucky.


Credit Scores are important for getting approved for a Mortgage in Kentucky.

Credit Score Requirements for FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Loans in Kentucky
Credit Score Requirements for FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Loans in Kentucky

 

Below I have spelled out some info that will help you out when you look at your credit scores and what affects them and what you can do to help your credit scores in order to prepare for a mortgage loan approval when it comes to your credit scores.

  1. Opting out will help a credit score.
    No it won’t. The bureaus don’t know if someone has opted out or not and it’s not factored into the credit scores. If someone’s score improves after they have opted out it’s because something else has changed on the report but not because they opted out.
  2. Paying off old delinquencies will remove them from your credit report.
    No a collection account or an account with late payments will stay on a credit report for 7 years. That being said, the credit bureaus will occasionally go in and remove old collections that have not reported for a while. But that’s at their discretion. Just because you paid if off doesn’t mean it will be removed. Also paying off an older collection with then brings the reporting date current which could actually hurt the credit scores.
  3. All rate shopping inquiries are the same.
    If you are rate shopping for a mortgage or auto, all inquiries with Trans Union and Equifax have a 45 day window. For Experian however it’s only 15 days. For revolving inquiries there is no “shopping” period. All those inquiries are counted no matter what the time frame is.
  4. Opening new accounts will help your credit score.
    This will help only if the borrower has no established credit yet. Once you have several accounts, opening new ones will actually have a negative affect on a credit score until substantial history is accumulated on the account.
  5. Paying off all your revolving balances is a good thing!
    Actually no it’s not. The credit bureaus models like to see at least one revolving balance, even if it’s small. Having no revolving balances can actually have a negative impact on a credit score. So always keeping one account with a small balance is a very good idea.
  6. Your credit is affected by how much money you have in your savings or checking accounts.
    Neither of these are factored into a credit score.
  7. Closing old accounts will help a credit score.
    The credit scoring models like to see several open accounts that have zero balances and are not used often. When an account is closed you lose that history. If it’s an account you’ve had for a long time and has no late payments, closing it can actual hurt the credit score. Having several open accounts, even if they are not used much, makes it look like a person has good financial responsibility.
  8. When I check my own credit score it’s the same one used by lenders.
    Unfortunately no it’s not. A person actually has 69+ different credit scores. The ones that lenders use are completely different than what a borrower sees when they get their own scores. Those are personal scores and are not used by any industry for any reason.
  9. Checking my own credit report will hurt my score.
    When a consumer checks their own credit report it’s a “soft” inquiry and will not impact the scores. Only “hard” inquiries done by creditors when a consumer applies for a loan or credit card will possibly have a negative affect on a credit score.

It’s  possible to avoid paying for your credit score or at least an estimate. Here is a list of all of the well-known ways to get a FICO score or score estimate for free:

Free FICO credit scores:

For free estimates of your credit score estimates and credit monitoring:

Also see the Wikipedia page on free credit report websites.

Credit cards (no annual fee) that offer a free FICO score with their monthly statement or online:

  • Amazon Synchrony Store Card (TransUnion, FICO-08)
  • American Express (Experian, FICO-08)
  • Bank of America Cards (TransUnion, FICO-08)
  • Barclaycards including the Sallie Mae Mastercard (TransUnion, FICO)
  • Branded Citibank cards (Equifax, FICO-08)
  • Chase Slate (Experian, FICO)
  • Discover cards (Transunion, FICO-08)
  • FNBO Cards (Experian, FICO-08 Bankcard)
  • Walmart Store Card (TransUnion, FICO)
  • Wells Fargo Cards (FICO)

Deposit accounts that offer a free FICO score with their monthly statement:

  • Digital Credit Union (EQ-05: Mortgage Score)

Credit cards (no annual fee) that offer a free estimated credit score online:

  • Capital One credit cards (TransUnion, VantageScore 3.0)

Note that score ranges vary between FICO scores and other scores:

  • FICO: 300 to 850 (used in 85-90% of credit decisions)
  • VantageScore (used in 10-15% of credit decisions)
    • VantageScore pre-3.0: 501 to 990
    • VantageScore 3.0: 300 to 850
  • TransUnion New Account Score: 300 to 850 (score estimate)
  • Equifax: 280 to 850 (score estimate)
  • Experian: 330 to 830 (score estimate)

Image result for credit scores and mortgage loans

 

 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.

Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/

— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

— 

Score Requirement on Kentucky FHA Loans for people with bad credit
Lowers Minimum Credit Score Requirement on Kentucky FHA Loans

Kentucky FHA Home loan programs for people with bad credit

FHA loans are designed to make housing more affordable with lower down payment requirements than conventional loans on purchases and less home equity requirements on refinances. Less stringent qualification guidelines and the security of a government-insured loan makes FHA a popular choice for consumers.

Kentucky FHA Loans with 580 Credit scores and – Low Down Payment – 3.5% which can be gifted from relatives or borrowed off one’s retirement account. If your scores is between 500-579, 10% down needed for home loan and subject to underwriting approval.

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How are collections treated on a Mortgage loan in Kentucky for a FHA and Conventional Loan Approval?


Collection Account Tips for Fannie Mae and FHA Loan in Kentucky. Do they have to be paid to get approved for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?
Collection accounts  on the credit report can sometimes hurt your chances of getting approved for a Kentucky Mortgage loan in Two ways:
First, if collections are recent, they may drag down your credit score, and secondly, if large enough, sometimes they are required to be paid before closing and final loan approval
Collections accounts for a debt that have been submitted to a collection agency by the creditor generally due to nonpayment. Below are general tips and guidance on what the FHA and Fannie Mae Underwriters will require when collection accounts are reporting on a borrower’s credit report. Accounts that are reported as past due but not yet turned over to a collection agency must be brought current. These past due accounts are not considered collection accounts.
Kentucky Fannie Mae or Conventional loans  – Underwriting must follow AUS or Automated Underwriting findings through DU  to determine if a collection account must be paid. Typically DU will require the following:
  • One Unit Principal Residence loans will not require pay off of collections or non-mortgage charge offs regardless of the amount. 
  • Two – Four Unit Owner Occupied and Second Home loans will require collections and non-mortgage charge offs totaling more than $5,000 to be paid in full prior to or at closing. 
  • Investment property loans will require any individual collection or non-mortgage charge off equal to or greater than $250 and all accounts that total more than $1000 to be paid in full prior to or at closing.
Kentucky FHA Mortgage Loans and Collections–
Underwriting must follow DU to determine if a collection account must be paid, even on a manual underwrite. Typically DU will require the following:
  • If the credit report shows a cumulative balance of $2,000 or more for collection accounts: 
  • The debt(s) must be paid in full prior to or at closing, or 
  • Payment arrangements must be made with the creditor and the monthly payment included in the DTI, or 
  • A monthly payment of 5% of the outstanding balances of each collection must be included in the borrower’s DTI. 
  • Collection accounts of non-borrowing spouses in a community property state must be included in the $2,000 cumulative balance and analyzed as part of the Borrower’s ability to pay all collection accounts. Community property states are Arizona, California, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin.
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/

— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

Lenders continue to lower FICO requirements for new homebuyers


Fico Score Requirements for Mortgage Lenders in Kentucky

 

The average agency FICO score for banks is high at 745, compared to 713 at nonbank lending institutions.  Both show FICO requirements are on the way down, but it’s more pronounced at the nonbanks. Here’s why.

Source: Lenders continue to lower FICO requirements for new homebuyers

 

The nation’s major banks are continuing to walk away from FHA-backed mortgages, according to the Urban Institute’s Housing Finance Policy Center February Chartbook.

And not only are nonbanks stepping in to take over the space, overall, they are continuing to ease access to credit.

“Bank and nonbank FICO scores reveal that nonbanks brought the Agency median FICO down four points to 726 between November 2018 and January 2019,” the Urban Institute said in an email.

The average agency FICO score for banks is high at 745, compared to 713 at nonbank lending institutions.  Both show FICO requirements on the way down, but it’s more pronounced at the nonbanks. Why?

Nonbanks are also more accommodating for increasing debt-to-income ratios, even as mortgage rates overall inch upward, driving up monthly mortgage payments for borrowers.

“The median LTV for nonbank and bank originations are comparable, while the median DTIs for nonbank loans are higher,” the report states.