Credit Scores for Kentucky VA, FHA, USDA , Fannie Mae Home Loans


What is the minimum credit score I need to qualify for a Kentucky FHA, VA, USDA and KHC Conventional mortgage loan in 2020?

 

Credit Score Requirements for Mortgage Loan

Credit Score Information For Kentucky Home buyers

Credit Scores are important for getting approved for a Mortgage in Kentucky.


Credit Scores are important for getting approved for a Mortgage in Kentucky.

Credit Score Requirements for FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Loans in Kentucky
Credit Score Requirements for FHA, VA, USDA and Conventional Loans in Kentucky

 

Below I have spelled out some info that will help you out when you look at your credit scores and what affects them and what you can do to help your credit scores in order to prepare for a mortgage loan approval when it comes to your credit scores.

  1. Opting out will help a credit score.
    No it won’t. The bureaus don’t know if someone has opted out or not and it’s not factored into the credit scores. If someone’s score improves after they have opted out it’s because something else has changed on the report but not because they opted out.
  2. Paying off old delinquencies will remove them from your credit report.
    No a collection account or an account with late payments will stay on a credit report for 7 years. That being said, the credit bureaus will occasionally go in and remove old collections that have not reported for a while. But that’s at their discretion. Just because you paid if off doesn’t mean it will be removed. Also paying off an older collection with then brings the reporting date current which could actually hurt the credit scores.
  3. All rate shopping inquiries are the same.
    If you are rate shopping for a mortgage or auto, all inquiries with Trans Union and Equifax have a 45 day window. For Experian however it’s only 15 days. For revolving inquiries there is no “shopping” period. All those inquiries are counted no matter what the time frame is.
  4. Opening new accounts will help your credit score.
    This will help only if the borrower has no established credit yet. Once you have several accounts, opening new ones will actually have a negative affect on a credit score until substantial history is accumulated on the account.
  5. Paying off all your revolving balances is a good thing!
    Actually no it’s not. The credit bureaus models like to see at least one revolving balance, even if it’s small. Having no revolving balances can actually have a negative impact on a credit score. So always keeping one account with a small balance is a very good idea.
  6. Your credit is affected by how much money you have in your savings or checking accounts.
    Neither of these are factored into a credit score.
  7. Closing old accounts will help a credit score.
    The credit scoring models like to see several open accounts that have zero balances and are not used often. When an account is closed you lose that history. If it’s an account you’ve had for a long time and has no late payments, closing it can actual hurt the credit score. Having several open accounts, even if they are not used much, makes it look like a person has good financial responsibility.
  8. When I check my own credit score it’s the same one used by lenders.
    Unfortunately no it’s not. A person actually has 69+ different credit scores. The ones that lenders use are completely different than what a borrower sees when they get their own scores. Those are personal scores and are not used by any industry for any reason.
  9. Checking my own credit report will hurt my score.
    When a consumer checks their own credit report it’s a “soft” inquiry and will not impact the scores. Only “hard” inquiries done by creditors when a consumer applies for a loan or credit card will possibly have a negative affect on a credit score.

It’s  possible to avoid paying for your credit score or at least an estimate. Here is a list of all of the well-known ways to get a FICO score or score estimate for free:

Free FICO credit scores:

For free estimates of your credit score estimates and credit monitoring:

Also see the Wikipedia page on free credit report websites.

Credit cards (no annual fee) that offer a free FICO score with their monthly statement or online:

  • Amazon Synchrony Store Card (TransUnion, FICO-08)
  • American Express (Experian, FICO-08)
  • Bank of America Cards (TransUnion, FICO-08)
  • Barclaycards including the Sallie Mae Mastercard (TransUnion, FICO)
  • Branded Citibank cards (Equifax, FICO-08)
  • Chase Slate (Experian, FICO)
  • Discover cards (Transunion, FICO-08)
  • FNBO Cards (Experian, FICO-08 Bankcard)
  • Walmart Store Card (TransUnion, FICO)
  • Wells Fargo Cards (FICO)

Deposit accounts that offer a free FICO score with their monthly statement:

  • Digital Credit Union (EQ-05: Mortgage Score)

Credit cards (no annual fee) that offer a free estimated credit score online:

  • Capital One credit cards (TransUnion, VantageScore 3.0)

Note that score ranges vary between FICO scores and other scores:

  • FICO: 300 to 850 (used in 85-90% of credit decisions)
  • VantageScore (used in 10-15% of credit decisions)
    • VantageScore pre-3.0: 501 to 990
    • VantageScore 3.0: 300 to 850
  • TransUnion New Account Score: 300 to 850 (score estimate)
  • Equifax: 280 to 850 (score estimate)
  • Experian: 330 to 830 (score estimate)

Image result for credit scores and mortgage loans

 

 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.

Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/

— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

— 

How are collections treated on a Mortgage loan in Kentucky for a FHA and Conventional Loan Approval?


Collection Account Tips for Fannie Mae and FHA Loan in Kentucky. Do they have to be paid to get approved for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan?
Collection accounts  on the credit report can sometimes hurt your chances of getting approved for a Kentucky Mortgage loan in Two ways:
First, if collections are recent, they may drag down your credit score, and secondly, if large enough, sometimes they are required to be paid before closing and final loan approval
Collections accounts for a debt that have been submitted to a collection agency by the creditor generally due to nonpayment. Below are general tips and guidance on what the FHA and Fannie Mae Underwriters will require when collection accounts are reporting on a borrower’s credit report. Accounts that are reported as past due but not yet turned over to a collection agency must be brought current. These past due accounts are not considered collection accounts.
Kentucky Fannie Mae or Conventional loans  – Underwriting must follow AUS or Automated Underwriting findings through DU  to determine if a collection account must be paid. Typically DU will require the following:
  • One Unit Principal Residence loans will not require pay off of collections or non-mortgage charge offs regardless of the amount. 
  • Two – Four Unit Owner Occupied and Second Home loans will require collections and non-mortgage charge offs totaling more than $5,000 to be paid in full prior to or at closing. 
  • Investment property loans will require any individual collection or non-mortgage charge off equal to or greater than $250 and all accounts that total more than $1000 to be paid in full prior to or at closing.
Kentucky FHA Mortgage Loans and Collections–
Underwriting must follow DU to determine if a collection account must be paid, even on a manual underwrite. Typically DU will require the following:
  • If the credit report shows a cumulative balance of $2,000 or more for collection accounts: 
  • The debt(s) must be paid in full prior to or at closing, or 
  • Payment arrangements must be made with the creditor and the monthly payment included in the DTI, or 
  • A monthly payment of 5% of the outstanding balances of each collection must be included in the borrower’s DTI. 
  • Collection accounts of non-borrowing spouses in a community property state must be included in the $2,000 cumulative balance and analyzed as part of the Borrower’s ability to pay all collection accounts. Community property states are Arizona, California, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin.
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346


Text/call 502-905-3708
kentuckyloan@gmail.com

http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/
If you are an individual with disabilities who needs accommodation, or you are having difficulty using our website to apply for a loan, please contact us at 502-905-3708.
Disclaimer: No statement on this site is a commitment to make a loan. Loans are subject to borrower qualifications, including income, property evaluation, sufficient equity in the home to meet Loan-to-Value requirements, and final credit approval. Approvals are subject to underwriting guidelines, interest rates, and program guidelines and are subject to change without notice based on applicant’s eligibility and market conditions. Refinancing an existing loan may result in total finance charges being higher over the life of a loan. Reduction in payments may reflect a longer loan term. Terms of any loan may be subject to payment of points and fees by the applicant  Equal Opportunity Lender. NMLS#57916http://www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org/

— Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. The content in this marketing advertisement has not been approved, reviewed, sponsored or endorsed by any department or government agency. Rates are subject to change and are subject to borrower(s) qualification.

Lenders continue to lower FICO requirements for new homebuyers


Fico Score Requirements for Mortgage Lenders in Kentucky

 

The average agency FICO score for banks is high at 745, compared to 713 at nonbank lending institutions.  Both show FICO requirements are on the way down, but it’s more pronounced at the nonbanks. Here’s why.

Source: Lenders continue to lower FICO requirements for new homebuyers

 

The nation’s major banks are continuing to walk away from FHA-backed mortgages, according to the Urban Institute’s Housing Finance Policy Center February Chartbook.

And not only are nonbanks stepping in to take over the space, overall, they are continuing to ease access to credit.

“Bank and nonbank FICO scores reveal that nonbanks brought the Agency median FICO down four points to 726 between November 2018 and January 2019,” the Urban Institute said in an email.

The average agency FICO score for banks is high at 745, compared to 713 at nonbank lending institutions.  Both show FICO requirements on the way down, but it’s more pronounced at the nonbanks. Why?

Nonbanks are also more accommodating for increasing debt-to-income ratios, even as mortgage rates overall inch upward, driving up monthly mortgage payments for borrowers.

“The median LTV for nonbank and bank originations are comparable, while the median DTIs for nonbank loans are higher,” the report states.

HOW DO I GET MY CREDIT SCORE THAT MATTERS


Source: HOW DO I GET MY CREDIT SCORE THAT MATTERS

 

What factors influence how long it takes to repair your credit?

When a new client comes into our office to first go over their credit repair plan, they always ask the question, “How long will it take to bring my score back up?”

Of course, it’s an important thing to know, but the answer has a lot to do with a multitude of factors. The good news is that you can control most of these factors by employing a responsible and effective credit repair with Blue Water Credit. Together, we can make sure that we bring your FICO to top form as quickly as possible!

Before we dig into these factors, let’s take a look at what we do know for sure. According to Vantage Score, here are some general timelines for how long it typically takes to improve your credit score after certain events or items report. Of course, individual cases may vary.

 

Applying for new credit

Average recovery time: 3 months

Negative impact on your credit score: Light

 

Closing an existing account

Average recovery time: 3 months

Negative impact on your credit score: Light

 

Maxing out your credit card

Average recovery time: 3 months

Negative impact on your credit score: Medium

 

Missing payments/defaulting

Average recovery time: 18 months

Negative impact on your credit score: Heavy

 

Chapter 7 or 11 Bankruptcy

Average recovery time: 6-7 years

Negative impact on your credit score: Heavy

 

Here are some factors that help determine the timeframe for credit repair:

 

  1. The severity of the damage

Of course, different negative items that hit your credit report hold different weight, lowering your score accordingly. For instance, one late payment on a credit card will ding your score far less than a collection, foreclosure, or bankruptcy. The bigger the damage to your score, the longer it may take to bring it back up to your previous high.

 

  1. How you handle your credit repair (and WHO is handling it!)

Fixing your credit is all based on disputing negative items, duplicates, incorrect information, mistakes, and anything else that’s acting like an anchor. The process involves writing and submitting formal dispute letters, and you have to do that with each of the credit bureaus for each negative item you want to flag. Once those disputes are registered, the credit bureaus are mandated to get back to you within a certain timeframe, either with evidence that the credit item is accurate, or to remove it. Therefore, you need to be incredibly organized, diligent, and persistent when handling your credit repair in order for it to move as quickly and efficiently as possible. Too many people try to do it on their own, only to fall off very quickly and see no progress (or even hurt their credit more!) Using a reputable and established credit repair company like Blue Water Credit is the best path to a better credit score!

 

  1. How many accounts you need to repair

If you have one negative account on your report, you’ll probably be able to repair your credit and improve your score much faster than if you have two, five, or even ten negative items to dispute. Not only is it more work, but we may have to resubmit dispute letters more than once for some accounts, which stretches out the timeline.

 

  1. Your credit score when you start

The higher your score when the negative reporting hits, the more difficult it is to recover, and therefore takes longer.) FICO offers some useful information regarding how long it may take to rebuild your credit score based on where it started:

 

Late payment on mortgage

Starting score:

780 FICO 3-7 years

720 FICO 3 years

680 FICO 9 months

 

Short sale of home

Starting score:

780 FICO 7 years

720 FICO 7 years

680 FICO 3 years

 

Foreclosing on home

Starting score:

780 FICO 7 years

720 FICO 7 years

680 FICO 3 years

 

Chapter 7 or 11 Bankruptcy

Starting score:

780 FICO 7 to 10 years

720 FICO 7 to 10 years

680 FICO 5 years

 

  1. Doing everything right during the process

You may think it goes without saying, but you’ll have to make manage your credit correctly during the repair process to avoid adding any other black marks on your report. For instance, you should pay all of your payments on time without fail and avoid maxing out credit cards or opening new accounts that may hurt you. Why is this so important? These days, identity theft, data hacks, and financial fraud affects about one out of every seven people, so you’ll want to monitor your credit and protect your score from sinking like a stone because of foul play.

 

  1. Your ability (and desire) to pay down debt

Your credit utilization makes up about 30% of your FICO score, which is just the ratio of debt you owe versus your total available balance (second only to payment history at 35%). So, you should pay down your credit cards and revolving accounts, optimally to about 10% of your total balance if you want to improve your score (but at least below 30%). However, be careful not to pay off certain accounts completely, close older accounts that are helping you, or pay off collections – all of which will hurt your score.

 

  1. Adding new positive tradelines

When we open some credit files, we see that consumers actually need more credit. Keeping a good mix of revolving, installment, and mortgage debts accounts for about 10% of your score, so we will advise you what you need to optimize that factor and improve your score as quickly as possible. Additionally, some people who have seen their score bottom out need to add new accounts using secured credit cards just to get started and become creditworthy again.

More Information below about Credit Scores and Qualifying for a Mortgage Loan in Kentucky below:

 

see links

 

 


I can answer your questions and usually get you pre-approved the same day. 


Call or Text me at 502-905-3708 with your mortgage questions.
Email Kentuckyloan@gmail.com








Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
10602 Timberwood Circle Suite 3
Louisville, KY 40223
Company ID #1364 | MB73346
 


Text/call 502-905-3708

 kentuckyloan@gmail.com


 
The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only.  The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines.  This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the view of  my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people.
, NMLS ID# 57916, (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). I lend in the following states: Kentucky

How to boost your credit score for A Mortgage Loan Approval in Kentucky!


 

Want to increase your credit score before buying a home? It might be easier than you think. Focus on these 6 steps and watch your score climb.

Source: How to boost your credit score

What Can Improve a Credit Score

Keep Your Balances Low

It’s important that you try to keep your balances at 40 percent or lower. Generally speaking, the less you owe, the less you’ll need to pay off. Not to mention, the less you owe to your lenders, the better you look as a borrower, and the higher your credit score will be.

Pay Your Bills on Time (Or Early)

The last thing you want is to get behind on your credit card bills, this is where your balances will start getting out of control, and you’ll be spending more than you like. It’s crucial to your credit score that you make payments on time if not early, to improve your overall score.

Sort Out Accounts in Collection

You can keep on trying to transfer it to new accounts, but we suggest that you simply pay off your balances to avoid the hassle. Once you know who your debt collection agency is, contact them and see what you have to do to pay off the balance and report it as “paid off” on your credit score.

However, if the debt seems inaccurate, you should dispute it immediately with the three credit bureaus. The sooner you get your accounts in collection sorted out and paid off, the quicker your credit score will improve.

Get a Secured Credit Card

A secured credit card is a form of credit card that makes you deposit money into the card itself as the line of credit. However, it’s single-handedly the best type of credit card to help your credit grow because you can get one with even the worst credit.

Don’t Delete Old Debt from Your Credit Report

Old debt that is handled correctly is actually a good thing. It shows creditors that you are responsible with your credit. Many people make the mistake of trying to remove an account from their report as soon as it is all paid off. Leaving good debt on your account will lengthen your credit history and boost your score.

Pay your bills on time, every time

Your payment history on credit cards, car loans, utilities, etc. is the single biggest factor in your credit score, weighted at about 35 percent. Even a single 30-day-late payment could knock 100 points off your score — and that can really hurt. FICO considers how late you were, how many times, how much was owed, and how recently it happened.

You can’t erase the fact that you were late — that will stay on your credit report for up to seven years – but you can get back on track and move on. The farther slip-ups recede into the past, the less they affect your current score. If your credit history doesn’t have a lot of other problems in it, your score will recover pretty quickly.

So if you’ve missed any recent payments, get current and stay current. We recommend setting up automatic payments or reminders for those times when life gets out of hand.

Pay down debt, especially on credit cards

The size of your debt accounts for about 30 percent of your credit score, so shrinking it is another priority. Your credit cards are the best place to start, especially if you’ve overdone it. Stop using them and start paying more than the minimum monthly payment on the one with the highest interest rate.

Once you pay off an account, you don’t necessarily want to close it. Having unused credit is actually very good, you’re building credit history and demonstrating that you have your financial act together. In mortgage terms, you’re a low risk. But lenders don’t want to see high balances or too much of your income going to monthly debt payments.

The last debt to pay off is medical debt. Even FICO recognizes that medical debt is the pits, so it hurts your credit score less than other kinds. Next-to-last is student loan debt, partly because it’s an installment loan that’s expected to be long-term: paying it off early won’t help your score (although it will help your debt-to-income ratio). It’s also understood as an investment in your future income.

 

Control your credit utilization ratio (wait, what?)

 

Your credit utilization ratio reflects how much of your credit you’re using within a monthly billing cycle. Basically, you don’t want the balance on your monthly statement to be more than 30 percent of your limit. Even if you pay it off in full by the due date, your score is getting dinged. The statement balance is what’s being reported to the credit bureaus, and a high one makes it look like you’re “utilizing” the plastic a lot. So try to keep the balance that shows up on your monthly statement under 20 or even 10 percent of your limit.

if you have questions about qualifying as first time home buyer in Kentucky, please call, text, email or fill out free prequalification below for your next mortgage loan pre-approval.
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Debt to Income Ratios for A Kentucky Mortgage Loan


Debt to Income Ratios for A Kentucky Mortgage Loan

580. 720, 680, 600, 620 credit score for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan FHA, VA, KHC, USDA
580. 720, 680, 600, 620 credit score for a Kentucky Mortgage Loan FHA, VA, KHC, USDA

There are two debt-to-income (DTI) ratios on every loan: housing or front-end ratio and total or back-end ratio. The housing ratio tells us what percentage of the borrower’s monthly gross income is allocated toward the monthly principal, interest, tax, and insurance (PITI) payment. The total ratio includes the monthly PITI and all other monthly debts including auto loans, credit cards, child support expenses, student loans and more.

PITI / Total Qualifying Monthly Income = Front-end %

(PITI + All other Debts) / Monthly Income = Back-end %

The DTI ratios are one of the cornerstones of mortgage lending. They help us determine the borrower’s ability to repay the mortgage loan. Historically, borrowers with a higher DTI have had a higher default rate, making them a higher risk for lending. As a result, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, FHA, private mortgage insurance (PMI) companies, and investors have all set DTI limits based on program, product, property, and loan purpose.

 

As an underwriter or processor, it is our duty to insure the DTI on our automated underwriting system (AUS) findings is correct and matching the Underwriting Transmittal (1008). We should be performing a manual DTI calculation to double check our loan origination systems’ (LOS) calculation.

 

There are times when data is entered incorrectly into the LOS and the ratios are inaccurate. The most common factor that creates a DTI error is when the borrower owns multiple properties. When entering the housing expenses for these properties, you must learn how to properly manipulate your LOS to yield the correct DTI. Performing the manual calculation is the way to “back into” the correct DTI.

 

 

I specialize in First Time Home Buyers and move-up buyers. I have helped over 500 families buy their first home or second home and I would like to help your family. FHA, Rural Housing, KHC( Zero down loans ), VA, Conventional loans. Free credit report and Free pre-approvals within 1 hour..Call me today at 502-905-3708 or email me at kentuckyloan@gmail.com- (NMLS# 57916)