FHA changes may aid those who lost homes


FHA changes may aid those who lost homes.

Kentucky FHA changes may aid those who lost homes

The Federal Housing Authority has shortened the mandatory waiting periods for an Kentucky  FHA-insured mortgage loan for those who have undergone foreclosure, deed-in-lieu, taken a short sale or declared bankruptcy during the economic recession.

 

Through its new program, Back to Work—Extenuating Circumstances, the waiting period for most borrowers is now just 12 months instead of the typical three, seven or 10 years. Both first-time and repeat home-buyers can apply. “Most people do not know this program has been released, and are only renting because

If you feel like you qualify for this and live in Kentucky, please call or email me with your questions and I would be glad to see if you qualify for the new Kentucky FHA Program for free.

 

Joel Lobb (NMLS#57916)
Senior  Loan Officer
 
American Mortgage Solutions, Inc.
 800 Stone Creek Pkwy, Ste 7,
Louisville, KY 40223
((502) 905-3708 |

FHA changes may aid those who lost homes

FHA expands mortgage backing to the once bankrupt | 2013-08-16 | HousingWire


FHA expands mortgage backing to the once bankrupt | 2013-08-16 | HousingWire.

SURRENDURING YOUR HOME IN BANKRUPTCY


SURRENDURING YOUR HOME IN BANKRUPTCY.

 

Kentucky Mortgage after a bankruptcy, foreclosure, short sale approval
by: Tracy L. Hirsch, Attorney

One of the hardest decisions a family has to make is deciding to surrender their home in a bankruptcy proceeding. Often times, this means allowing a home to go through the foreclosure process and discharging their mortgage obligations in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Many homeowners are concerned about the foreclosure process and their obligations to their mortgage company once their bankruptcy process is complete.

 

Often times, when a person chooses to surrender their home in bankruptcy, he is in the middle of the foreclosure process. Filing a bankruptcy petition creates an automatic stay, which puts an immediate halt to the foreclosure process.

The mortgage company may then choose to either file a motion with the court to re-start the foreclosure process (called a motion to terminate the automatic stay) during the 90 days of the Chapter 7 process or wait until the Chapter 7 is discharged to initiate the process again. Either way, foreclosure is a long, legal process and it often takes anywhere from four to eight months for the house to be sold at the foreclosure sale. Regardless of when the bankruptcy is complete, the home still belongs to the homeowner until the home is sold at the commissioner’s sale.

In order to understand why bankruptcy may not be immediately necessary in order to get out from under a mortgage, one needs to understand how the foreclosure process works. In most states, including Kentucky and Indiana, creditors are required to utilize a process called judicial foreclosure.

The way it works is this. Once there has been a default, the creditor initiates the foreclosure process by filing a Complaint in the Circuit Court of the county where the property is located. The creditor must then obtain service of the Complaint on the debtor in a manner permitted by law. Once service has been obtained, the debtor then has 20 days to answer the Complaint. The purpose of this is to allow the debtor to assert any defenses that he may have. If the debtor fails to file an Answer to the Complaint, then the creditor gets a default judgment.

After obtaining a default judgment against the debtor, the creditor may then proceed to obtain a sale date. Normally it takes at least 4 months or longer from the time of service of the Complaint until the sale date. On the sale date, the property is auctioned off at the courthouse to the highest bidder. The proceeds of the sale are then credited to the loan, and what is left over, referred to as the deficiency balance, is what the debtor owes the creditor.

If the property sells for enough to cover the balance of the loan, then there is no debt that is owed by the debtor. So until such time that the property actually sells at foreclosure, it is impossible to know for sure how much the debtor will actually get stuck with. So if you owe $150,000 on your mortgage, this does not mean that you personally are on the hook for that amount. If the house sells for $140,000, then you only owe the $10,000 difference.

So before you decide that you need to file bankruptcy solely because your home is going into foreclosure, you may want to wait and see what the outcome is from the foreclosure sale. You may owe less than you think. Now if you have other reasons for filing bankruptcy, such as credit card or medical debt that you can’t pay, then it makes sense to go ahead with the filing. But if it is all about your mortgage, you may want to wait and see what the damages are before pulling the trigger on a bankruptcy filing.

Joel Lobb
Senior  Loan Officer
(NMLS#57916)
 

Text or call phone: (502) 905-3708
 
 
 

The view and opinions stated on this website belong solely to the authors, and are intended for informational purposes only.  The posted information does not guarantee approval, nor does it comprise full underwriting guidelines.  This does not represent being part of a government agency. The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of my employer. Not all products or services mentioned on this site may fit all people

 

 

Obama foreclosure program helps some Louisville homeowners, but not many


Obama foreclosure program helps some Louisville homeowners, but not many.

Obama foreclosure program helps some Louisville homeowners, but not many

Credit Scores required for A Kentucky First Time Home Buyer in 2013


Have you ever thought what kind of credit score it takes to buy a home in Kentucky in 2013. I have supplied some examples below for Kentucky First Time Home Buyers so they can arm themselves with some knowledge and feel comfortable and confident when they take that step to get pre-approved to buy a Home in Kentucky

 

Interested in understanding how far a credit score can drop with late payments, foreclosure, short sale activity or bankruptcy?

 

This should give you an idea:

 

30 days late: 40 – 110 points

90 days late: 70 – 135 points

Foreclosure, short sale or deed-in-lieu: 85 – 160 points

Bankruptcy: 130 – 240 points

 

To come to these figures, Fair Isaac created two hypothetical consumers, one who starts out with a fair-to-middling score of 680 and the other with a very good one of 780. (FICO scores range from 300 to 850.)

 

The hypothetical person with the 780 FICO has 10 credit accounts versus six for the 680, plus a longer credit history, lower utilization of total credit limit and no missed payments on any account. The other consumer has two slightly damaged accounts. Neither have any accounts in collection or adverse public records.

 

Borrower #1  Borrower#2

680                         780                    Initial Score

620-640                670-690                30 Day Delinquency

595-610                645-665                90 Day Delinquency

575-595                620-640                Foreclosure Short  Sale

530-550                540-560                Bankruptcy

Source: Fair Isaac Corp. 

 

 

 

Kentucky Mortgage Loan Approval Credit Requirements for 2013

Lost home to foreclosure but ready to buy again? Prepare to wait in lender ‘penalty box’


Lost home to foreclosure but ready to buy again? Prepare to wait in lender ‘penalty box’.


LOS ANGELES (AP) — Next to filing for bankruptcy protection, nothing wrecks your chances of qualifying for a home loan like a foreclosure.

And if you got out from under an oppressive mortgage through a short sale — when the bank agrees to accept less than what the homeowner owes — lenders can look upon you just as unfavorably.

It’s a reality that the former owners of the more than 4 million homes lost to foreclosure in the six years since the housing bubble burst will have to confront if they want to own again. But the passage of time makes all the difference.

That’s because mortgage-lending guidelines that most banks follow prohibit them from making loans to people with foreclosure or a short sale in their credit history, often for years. Never mind the hit that one’s credit score takes.

Still, some of the homeowners who were foreclosed upon when the market first started to skid are now looking to buy and getting loans.

“They’re probably going to pay a little higher interest rate, but with rates so low, a higher interest rate of 4 percent is not a big deal,” said Rosa Herwick, a broker and owner of Century 21 JR Realty in Henderson, Nev.

So how likely are banks to approve your mortgage application if you have a real estate-related blemish on your record? And can you do anything to spring yourself from the mortgage penalty box?

It depends on several factors, but largely on whether you had a foreclosure or a short sale.

FORECLOSURE


Generally, borrowers who have a foreclosure in their credit history can expect to wait between two to seven years before a lender will even accept their loan application.

The waiting periods stem from guidelines most banks must follow in order to be able to sell their home loans. That’s because potential purchasers, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, each have a different set of guidelines for the loans they will buy and criteria for whom they deem a qualified borrower.

The fact is, a person’s credit score, employment history and other factors that make up one’s creditworthiness will take a back seat to these resale guidelines.

If a buyer with a past foreclosure is seeking a government-backed mortgage, the waiting period can vary before they can qualify.

Take the Federal Housing Administration, which insures roughly 30 percent of new loans. Under its guidelines, former homeowners must wait three years from the date of their foreclosure before they can qualify for backing by the agency.

Compare the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s housing program which requires three years, while the time penalty for a VA loan is two years. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which own or guarantee about half of all mortgages, require the longest stretch: seven years after a foreclosure.

In some cases, the waiting periods for a foreclosure can be reduced.

Fannie Mae, for example, allows a three-year waiting period in the event the foreclosure was due to an extenuating circumstance. The company defines this as an event that was beyond the homeowners’ control and resulted in a sudden reduction in income or catastrophic increase in financial obligations. Think job layoff, medical bills or divorce.

FHA may grant an exception to its waiting period in the event a wage-earner becomes seriously ill or dies. A divorce may qualify for an exception, but only in certain cases.

SHORT SALES

The roadblocks for having a short sale in your credit history can be less severe, and in some cases, waived altogether.

FHA requires borrowers who weren’t paying their mortgage when they sold their house to wait three years before they can qualify for a home loan. That time penalty may be waived in certain cases, including long-term job loss.

There is no FHA time penalty for homeowners who made their house payments in the 12 months before their short sale.

The size of a down payment can also shorten the waiting period.

A down payment of 20 percent or more will cut Fannie Mae’s time penalty on a borrower with a short sale down to two years from seven. Buyers who put down 10 percent can qualify after four years.

CREDIT SCORE

It’s no longer just a waiting game for homeowners caught up in the earliest stages of the foreclosure crisis in 2007 and 2008.

There’s still the impact a foreclosure or short sale has on one’s credit score — still very much a factor in qualifying for a loan.

Like most credit blemishes, foreclosures and short sales will remain in your credit history for seven years.

As a general rule, the higher your FICO score, the more it will drop as a result of a bad debt, said Barry Paperno, consumer affairs manager for MyFICO.com, the consumer website for FICO.

FICO credit scores range from 300 to 850. In simulations, a foreclosure sent a FICO score of about 720 down to as low as 570 and took about seven years to recover fully, assuming everything else being equal.

Still, there are steps one can take to burnish one’s tarnished credit rating.

— While in the foreclosure penalty box, make sure to pay all your bills on time.

— Get more credit. This may sound counterintuitive after a foreclosure, but beefing up your track record of good credit accounts can help boost one’s credit score. A car loan or a credit card will do. But if you get a credit card, pay it off every month.

— Be patient. A foreclosure’s drag on your credit score will decline over time.

— Dispute any mistakes on your credit report, which can lower your score.

— Don’t close your oldest credit accounts. Your score gets a boost from older credit lines.

— Scale back your lifestyle and pocket the savings toward a future down payment.

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